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Buck Biloxi, Liquid Skuills, Clutch: The Boy Wonder, and a Smithsonian Folkways Track from Ivan Kozlovsky/Alexander Ivanov-Kramskoy

Today at work I listened to first-of-the-year episodes of Best Table In Hell and Dynamite Hemorrhage. Both of 'em are great podcasts.

DH's Jay Hinman did a good interview with Tim Scott from Noisey Australia. At the end of it, Scott asks Hinman, "What music trends would you like to see disappear in 2015?" And Hinman sez he'd like to see "all-male bands who fashion themselves as “aggro” and “brutal” to mellow the fuck out."

I'm not an angry young man anymore, but I was once, for sure, and there's a lot of stuff to be angry about in the world. I think I have brushed my teeth with enough fluoride that I've been rendered docile. But if anger is the feeling someone wants to express, I'll break it down from there. I won't post someone who's angry at Puerto Ricans or Transhumanists, you know that. Bands who propagate racism and intolerance should be ashamed of themselves. But if you are mad at establishment culture, or the government, or the guys who kicked you out of Shadowrun, then fr sure, I totally grok.

I listened to a lot of Buck Biloxi and the Fucks today also. During my lunch break I read the Hinman/Scott interview mentioned above, and also a 2013 Terminal Boredom interview with Biloxi by Chuck Barrels. In the interview, Biloxi makes a distinction between what he terms "real punk" and "hardcore," and I made the connection between Hilman's and Biloxi's comment.

I post a lot of bands on CNQ that I think fit the description of "aggro," "brutal," and what Biloxi means by "hardcore." My wife calls it "music that is not fun" - what the kids call screamo (and, apparently, skramz?), and crust/powerviolence, and the grindcore I was familiar with growing up. But I've always labeled all of that on CNQ as "punk," just as I would a Buck Biloxi tune, or a Burger Records garage-rock band. They're all just variations on a theme, IMO.

Anyway, that's what I thought about today at work as I performed tasks.

Check out my main man Jimmy Spice's sweet nu-gazin' Liquid Skulls track:

This new hip-hop from Harlem is strangely powerful:

Smithsonian Folkways is wonderful, gang. Just wonderful. Ivan Kozlovsky was a famous Russian tenor and Alexander Ivanov-Kramskoy was a famous classical guitarist. Check out their collab, I'm not sure what year this is from. The 50s or 60s, I guess: